Slow Motion Bias

Beth Mole covers a new study that shows that "slow motion might actually muddle" our perception of premeditation: To see if artificially lengthened footage can alter perceptions, the researchers showed 489 volunteers a similar five-second video clip of an armed robbery that ended with a robber shooting a sales clerk. Participants watched the clip at … Continue reading Slow Motion Bias

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Good night, D.B. Cooper

It's been nearly 45 years since a man known as D.B. Cooper hijacked a plane, exchanged passengers for $200,000 and parachutes, then leapt out of the back of the plane and into mystery. Now the FBI is finally closing the case in order to keep resources from being diverted on a fool's errand. Peter Holley reports: “Although … Continue reading Good night, D.B. Cooper

We have to do better than the death penalty.

Clint Smith writes on the injustice of the death penalty for The New Yorker: Those who support the death penalty are accepting a practice that is both ineffective and fundamentally flawed. It means supporting a system that not infrequently kills those with serious mental illness. It means supporting a system in which an execution is far more likely to … Continue reading We have to do better than the death penalty.

The Noble, Morbid and Tedious Process of Identifying the Nameless Dead

When a person dies, those close to the deceased usually follow a typical procedure: death is declared, a funeral or memorial service is arranged, the person's affairs are concluded. If the person died suspiciously or violently, extra investigative steps must be followed; but the routine is similar. But what happens when a person dies and … Continue reading The Noble, Morbid and Tedious Process of Identifying the Nameless Dead