Outdoor Research with the Quickness

As more companies consciously make an effort to keep sexism out of their marketing content, others are stuck in the Mad Men mentality of the past. The latest example: GQ published a piece on fall fashion for which they took a group of male rock climbers, a few female models and lots of really expensive clothing to Joshua Tree National Park and took some photos.

As Ryan Fliss at The Dyrt pointed out, the article features “women who they admit are auxiliary objects: ‘we took three premier climbers and a couple of cute friends weekend warrioring.'” (Emphasis The Dyrt.)

The article truly is over the top in its celebration of male athleticism and its myopic focus on female sexuality. But where many people saw just another source of outrage, Outdoor Research saw an opportunity for education through satire.

Outdoor Research, in just four days, recreated the article and its photos in their entirety—only at a different location, with the gender roles swapped, and with a lot more snark.

The Outdoor Research post reads like a combination of The Onion and Wonkette.

Maybe that’s why millions of people are taking up climbing—they’re tired of just looking good in their active wear indoors. They want more.

“I just really like being able to hang around on the rocky crag and show off my cool climbing clothes, instead of just the gym,” said Kjersti C. “And there are always cute boys, just sitting around half naked watching us. Usually they’re just hanging out in the cars, keeping our beer cold and waiting to give us foot massages after a long day of sending hard. But sometimes, they even let us hose them down or splash around in a river and get super sexy. It’s pretty cool.”

Outdoor Research also takes jabs at the GQ models sporting $1,000+ items of clothing while rock climbing. One caption reads:

Vest from Goodwill Thrift Store ($5). Tank from International Climbers Festival (complimentary)

How they turned this around in just four days I don’t know. But it’s a clever (and beautifully shot) response to GQ‘s vestigial method of selling clothes.

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